The Last Free Decade?

There were good and bad things about the 1980s. In one sense it was a very hedonistic and self-indulgent decade. A permissive attitude towards casual sex and drug use was on the rise. And I’m sure one could point to other things that were negative about the 80s. One thing is certain, though: people were still free. There were no smoking bans imposed by the state legislature and seatbelts were just a friendly suggestion. As a kid I sat in the front seat of the car, and road in the back of pick-ups. Gas was cheap and although there were environmentalist whackos back then too, they hadn’t started having an impact on laws and legislature quite as much as they do now. Enter the 90s, and the Clinton-Nanny State-“We know what is best for you” era, and now look at where we are. My wife had a good point–with the loss of religious faith as a collective whole, you have the government trying to create a “paradise” on earth by increasing regulation and telling everyone what they can and cannot do. What people don’t realize is that once you take freedoms away, they are not easily restored. Sometimes I wonder if the 80s was not the last free decade that we will see in the United States.

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About Rev. Paul L. Beisel

Graduate of Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, IN in 2001 (M Div.) and 2004 (S.T.M.); LC-MS Pastor and Adjunct Instructor for John Wood Community College; Husband of Amy and father of Susan, Elizabeth, Martin, and Theodore.
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3 Responses to The Last Free Decade?

  1. Anonymous says:

    Paul, buddy, we must be getting old. Ah, the 80’s…now those were the good ol’ days!

    Dan Grams

  2. Anastasia Theodoridis says:

    I worry about that, too. We’re too close for comfort to dictatorship already.

  3. Rev. Paul Beisel says:

    The sad thing is, it seems like most people are just taking it hook, line, and sinker. No one seems to care much about it. And the people who do don’t have the power to make a difference.

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